INDONESIAN LOANWORDS FROM ENGLISH

Welcome to the fifth and final segment of our five-part series on Indonesian Loanwords borrowed and adapted from other languages.


If you are just joining our series, you may want to check out our first four segments which explore Bahasa Indonesia Loanwords from Ancient Sanskrit (https://www.learnindonesian.education/post/indonesian-loanwords-from-sanskrit) ; Loanwords from Portuguese (https://www.learnindonesian.education/post/indonesian-loanwords-from-portuguese) ; Loanwords from Arabic and Farsi (https://www.learnindonesian.education/post/indonesian-loanwords-from-arabic-and-persian-farsi) ; and Loanwords from Dutch (https://www.learnindonesian.education/post/indonesian-loanwords-from-dutch).


In this segment, we will look at Bahasa Indonesia words borrowed and adapted from English.


Identifying Indonesian words derived from English is not an easy task. Why? Because English itself has borrowed and adapted almost 75% of its words from other languages!! Of the 600,000 English words defined in the Second Edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, only 130,000 can traced to the original English language spoken by the Anglo-Saxons of England. Indeed, 29% of modern-day English words have been borrowed from Latin ; another 29% have been borrowed from French ; 6% come from Greek ; and 10% are from other languages.


IN THIS ARTICLE, WILL LOOK ONLY AT TRULY-ENGLISH WORDS WHICH ORIGINATED WITH THE ANGLO-SAXONS OF ENGLAND.

1. KOKPIT


The Indonesian word kokpit comes from the English word cockpit, which refers to the compartment in which a pilot and/or co-pilot and/or crew control an aircraft or spacecraft.

2. KOBOI


The Indonesian word koboi comes from the English word cowboy, which means (1) a man who herds and tends cattle, performing much of his work on horseback, or (2) one having qualities associated with cowboys (such as recklessness, aggressiveness, or independence).

3. GIM


The Indonesian word gim comes from the English word game, related to a manner of play in a contest or sport.


It should be noted that, while the English word game can also refer to wild animals hunted for sport or food, Bahasa Indonesia does not apply this definition to the word gim.

4. GELAS


The Indonesian word gelas comes from the English word glass, referring to a container made of glass used for drinking.


It should be noted that, while the English word glass may refer to anything made of glass,the Indonesian Language only uses the word gelas to refer to a “drinking glass.”

5. GOL


The Indonesian word gol comes from the English word goal, referring to (1) a frame or net into which players must kick or hit the ball in order to score and the point that is scored for this, or (2) something that one hopes to achieve - an aim.

6. GOSIP


The Indonesian word gosip comes from the English verb gossip, referring to informal talk or stories about other people’s private lives that may be unkind and/or untrue.


It should be noted that, while the English verb gossip can also refer to be used as a noun to describe a person who perpetually indulges in the act of “gossiping,” Bahasa Indonesia does not apply this definition to the word gosip.

7. MARKAH


The Indonesian word markah comes from the English word mark.


Although mark has multiple meanings in English, the Indonesian word markah refers exclusively to a traffic sign.

8. MARKAH


The Indonesian word bisnis comes from the English word business referring to (1) a commercial enterprise or establishment, (2) a person’s work or trade, or (3) a commercial, industrial or professional activity.

And that brings us to the end of our fifth and final segment on Indonesian Loanwords.


Again, if you have enjoyed this article, please be sure to check out our previous four segments covering foreign words which Bahasa Indonesia has borrowed from other languages.


And don’t forget to look for our yet-to-be-announced new series, which will start one week from today.


Until then . . .

Selamat Belajar!!

INDONESIAN VISAS & ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Learn More

ACCOMMODATION RECOMMENDATIONS

FOR JAKARTA & BALI IMMERSION STUDENTS

Jakarta Accommodations

Bali Accommodations

LSI'S OFFICIAL GUEST HOUSE

Learn More

Copyright © 2006-2020 Language Studies Indonesia.

All rights reserved.

NEED HELP?

Interested in learning Bahasa Indonesia Online or in Jakarta? Email LANGUAGE STUDIES INDONESIA.
Interested in learning Indonesian Language Online or in Jakarta? ENROLL NOW with LANGUAGE STUDIES INDONESIA.

OUTSIDE INDONESIA

+ 62-21 . 2765-0454   (GMT + 7 Hours)

INSIDE INDONESIA

Toll-Free  0-800-1-BAHASA  (224272)

whatsapp.png

WHATSAPP BUSINESS  

+62 . 81-1191-7272

SKYPE IDENTIFICATION

lsi.admissions

  • YouTube
  • Instagram Social Icon
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • LinkedIn Social Icon